Coping With Failure

Failure is inevitable in everyone’s life. No matter how smart, focused or hardworking one is, a time will come where things won’t go the way we expected them to. While growing up, failures are a common occurrence.  The only way to battle this is to prepare your student or child, and be the support required when the time comes.
“Failure is a stepping stone to success” a common phrase we’ve heard time and again, but it must be noted that this is true only when one doesn’t get stuck on that stone, but merely uses it as a part of the journey he/she is on. Failure is good only if it means you’ve ended up learning something from it!
Here are a few tips, to make sure your child/student always is able to overcome and achieve the best!
1. Be supportive, and let your child take in the situation. 
Many times, as adults, it happens many times when we feel that failure could have been avoided and it was completely the child’s fault. This is a natural feeling, as most of the time you are right. However, at this moment the child is already going through some sorrow, giving him/her this information will only push him/her into a worse mental state. Let your child recover, tell them it’s okay and maybe share a story of your own failure from your childhood , and how today you barely even remember the consequences of the same. Assure your child that everything can be fixed, and you are always standing by their side to help them out.
2. Think of constructive advice
What is done is done, and the results can’t be changed. The only way ahead is to move on, stronger and more prepared. Look at the situation, reflect to find growth ideas and formulate a good plan to take things forward. Make sure to plan time to relax and de-stress too. Also, keep in mind what works for your child or student. They will only be able to keep up with the plan, if it works. Different people work in different ways, and true potential will only be achieved once you figure out the simplest and most efficient way of working.
The tone and manner of giving advice should also be taken care, it’s advice and help that is being offered, not a command. Take in the opinions of your child/student, and remember you have to be the support for them. You are a team.
3. Prep for the worst case. 
Make sure it’s clear to your child/student that failure is not a one time thing, it will occur in some way again, and there is no choice but to accept it. At the same time it’s important to understand that any failure is never as bad as it seems at the given time and can always be worked out of.
Failure is normal, failure is necessary, that’s all that you need your student/child to know. Reducing fear of failure will also reduce chances of failure, and help him/her cope better when required.
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